• Angela Bradbury

Angela R. Bradbury, MD

Biosketch

The volume of genomic testing is expected to increase given the large federal and commercial investment in genomic technologies designed to enhance personalized medicine. Translational research that evaluates the implementation, dissemination and “real world” outcomes of existing and new genomic applications is needed to guide the rational clinical integration of genomic advances to ultimately reduce the burden of cancer and improve human health. As a medical oncologist with specialized training in clinical cancer genetics, cancer prevention and medical ethics, I have been developing and leading translational genetic research focused on the ethics and clinical implementation of genetic medicine to promote the health of individuals and families since 2003. This work involves research and academic activities focused on: a) the delivery of genetic services, b) the implications of genetic medicine for children and adolescents and c) Ethical, Legal and Social Issues in genetic medicine. These translational and multidisciplinary studies (further described below) have been supported by the National Institutes of Health, American Cancer Society, Greenwall Foundation Program in Bioethics, American Society of Clinical Oncology and Pennsylvania Department of Health. We expect these studies, and subsequent studies within this research program to increase our understanding of how to incorporate genomic testing into the care of patients and families in a way that benefits the health and minimizes the risks for patients across the lifespan.

Selected Publications

Bradbury AR, Patrick-Miller L, Egleston BL, Schwartz LA, Sands CB, Shorter R, Moore C, Tuchman L, Rauch P, Malhotra S, Rowan B, Van Decker S, Schmidheiser H, Bealin, L, Sicilia P, Daly M:

2012 (accepted for publication). Knowledge and perceptions of breast cancer risk among adolescent girls at high-risk and population-risk for breast cancer. Breast Cancer Research and Treatment.

Bradbury AR, Patrick-Miller L, Egleston B, Olopade OI, Daly M, Moore C, Sands C, Schmidheiser H, Kondamudi PK, Feigon M, Ibe C, Daugherty CK:

2012. When parents disclose BRCA1/2 results: Their communication and perceptions of offspring response. Cancer 118(13): 3417-25.

Bradbury AR, Sands CB, Patrick-Miller L:

2011, Jan/Feb. Genetic testing: Should You Share This Information with Your Kids? Coping, p34.

Leachman SA, MacArthur DG, Angrist M, Gray SW, Bradbury AR, Vorhaus DB:

2011. Direct-to-Consumer Genetic Testing: Personalized Medicine in Evolution. American Society of Clinical Oncology 2011 Educational Book, pp. 34-40.

Bradbury AR, Patrick-Miller L, Fetzer D, Egleston BL, Cummings SA, Forman A, Bealin L, Peterson C, Corbman M, O’Connell J, Daly M:

2011. Genetic counselor opinions of, and experiences with telephone communication of BRCA1/2 test results. Clinical Genetics 79(2):125-131.

Bradbury AR, Patrick-Miller L, Egleston BL, Sands CB, Li T, Schmidheiser H, Feigon M, Pawlowski K, Ibe CN, Hlubocky F, Corbman M, Olopade OI, Daly MB, Daughterty C:

2010. Parent opinions regarding the genetic testing of minors for BRCA1/2. J Clin Oncol. 28(21):3498-505.

Patrick-Miller L, Bradbury AR, Terry MB:

2010, Feb. Controversies in communication of genetic screening results for cancer: a report from the American Society of Preventive Oncology's Screening Special Interest Group (ASPO's 33rd Annual Meeting, March 8 to 10, 2009, Tampa, Florida). Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev 19(2):624-7.

Bradbury AR, Patrick-Miller L, Pawlowski K, Ibe CN, Cummings SA, Hlubocky F, Olopade OI, Daugherty CK:

2009. Learning of your parent’s BRCA mutation during adolescence or early adulthood: A study of offspring experiences. Psycho-oncology 18(2):200-208.

Bradbury AR, Patrick-Miller L, Pawlowski K, Ibe CN, Cummings SA, Olopade OI, Daughterty CK:

2008. Should genetic testing for BRCA1/2 be permitted for minors? Opinions of BRCA mutation carriers and their adult offspring. American Journal of Medical Genetics 148C (1):70-77.

Bradbury AR, Olopade OI, Dignam JJ, Ibe CN, Auh SL, Hlubocky FJ, Cummings SA, White MA, Daugherty CK:

2007. How often do mutation carriers tell their young children of the family’s risk for cancer? A study of parental disclosure of BRCA mutations to minors and young adults. J Clin Oncol 25 (24): 3705-11.

Education

University of Chicago (Clinical Medical Ethics)

University of Chicago (Medical Oncology)

University of Chicago (Internal Medicine)

Medical University of South Carolina, MD

The University of Virginia, BA, Biology

Current Research

LEGACY (Lessons in Epidemiology and Genetics of Adult Cancer from Youth), supported by the National Institutes of Health. This study will follow the girls prospectively in order to evaluate epidemiologic and epigenetic pathways of childhood exposures in relation to pubertal development, age at menarche, breast tissue characteristics, biomarkers of exposure, genomic DNA methylation, and the psychosocial impact of increased breast cancer susceptibility in 6-13 YO girls. http://legacygirlsstudy.org/

Evaluating Parent to Offspring Communication of Hereditary risk (EPOCH), supported by the Basser Research Center for BRCA1/2. This study will evaluate the prevalence, content and methods of parental disclosure of BRCA test results to offspring under the age of 25 years old. https://www.penncancer.org/basser/brca-trials/trials.cfm

SOFT: A Study of Female Teens, supported by the Basser Research Center for BRCA1/2. The study will evaluate knowledge and perceptions of breast cancer risk and their impact on psychosocial adaptation and performance of health and risk behaviors among 11-19 YO girls at high-risk and population-risk for breast cancer. https://www.penncancer.org/basser/brca-trials/trials.cfm

COGENT: A Study of the Communication of GENetic Test Results by Telephone, supported by the National Institutes of Health. This study will evaluate the psychological and behavioral outcomes (i.e. risks and benefits) of telephone disclosure of genetic test results in a multi-center randomized trial comparing telephone communication to in-person communication of genetic test results in sociodemographically diverse clinical populations. http://rt5.cceb.med.upenn.edu/public/cogent/cogent_public_home.html

Virtual Genetics Clinic: Telemedicine Delivery in Community Clinics, supported by the National Institutes of Health. This study will evaluate the feasibility of telemedicine (i.e. videoconferencing) delivery of cancer genetic services at community practices and will provide preliminary data regarding the short-term psychological and behavioral outcomes of telemedicine delivery of cancer genetic services.