• full

You are viewing all posts

Meet the Class of 2018 MEHP Fellows

The Department of Medical Ethics and Health Policy is pleased to announce that Ronit Y. Stahl, PhD and Bege Dauda, PhD have been selected as Penn Fellows in Advanced Biomedical Ethics. Dr. Stahl is a historian whose scholarship addresses the role of religion in health-related public policy. Dr. Dauda is a…

Yes, We're Mammals, But Is It Wise These Days To Promote Breastfeeding As 'Natural'?

Hippos do it. So do orangutans. There’s no question that for us mammals, nursing is one of those defining behaviors in nature. The question is whether public health officials, in promoting breast-feeding among human mothers, should deploy the term “natural.” Two academics pondering these and other linguistically charged questions sparked an online…

MBE Student Anastasia Vishnevetsky Wins Health Photo Contest

Anastasia Vishnevetsky, a Master of Bioethics student and 4th year medical student at Penn, has won 1st Place in the Center for Global Health's 1st annual photo contest. The photo, taken in Cusco, Peru, is captioned: "...a photo of a nurse visiting an elderly woman in the villages outside Cusco…
Tags: MBE

How Well is the Affordable Care Act Doing? Reasons for Optimism

The Affordable Care Act (ACA) is now 6 years old. Fair-minded people want to know whether the ACA is succeeding. Even more important is the question of how it will do in the future. The context of the ACA’s past is important for understanding its future. The ACA narrowly passed. A…

Nurses and Industry: Conflict or Collaboration?

Registered nurses are integral members of health care teams in hospitals and other health care settings. As such, they play a pivotal role in the moral endeavors of health care and in the business of health care delivery. The nurses' primary commitment is to the patient, family, or community but, similar…

To Increase Group Exercise, Penn Study Suggests Rewarding the Individual and the Team

Financial incentives aimed at increasing physical activity among teams are most effective when the incentives are rewarded for a combination of individual and team performance, according to new research from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. The study, which examined the effectiveness of offering monetary rewards…

Who's Willing? Characteristics Associated with Willingness to Participate in Clinical Research

Clinical researchers struggle to meet subject recruitment goals, with one-third of studies underenrolled. Compounding this problem, ethnic and racial minorities are largely underrepresented in clinical research, limiting the ability of researchers to determine the effectiveness of treatments at the population level and for large subgroups of patients. Several theories have been…

The Ethics of Infection Challenges in Primates

In the midst of the recent Ebola outbreak, scientific developments involving infection challenge experiments on nonhuman primates (NHPs) sparked hope that successful treatments and vaccines may soon become available. Yet these studies pose a stark ethical quandary. On the one hand, they represent an important step in developing novel therapies and…

How a Zika Virus Breakthrough Vindicates Stem Cell Research

Modern biology needs tools. One of the most controversial of those tools has proven to be crucial to explaining how the Zika virus causes brain damage in newborns. Zika is poised to dwarf the threat of Ebola, which was never a significant danger to the United States in spite of…

Medical Ethics and Health Policy to Host Bioethics Film Festival

The Department of Medical Ethics and Health Policy of the University of Pennsylvania’s Perelman School of Medicine will hold its first annual “Bioethics Film Festival” on April 12-14 at the Annenberg Center for Performing Arts on Penn’s campus. The theme of the festival is “Authority and Rebellion,” a topic that festival…

Are there unintended consequences to calling breastfeeding 'natural'?

Breast-feeding: "It's only natural." It's a message women may have seen on Facebook or a state health department website, or heard on the radio, as part of a campaign launched in 2013 by the Department of Health and Human Services. But, according to a pair of experts, this type of campaign…

Meet the 2016 Bioethics Boot Campers

The Department of Medical Ethics and Health Policy is happy to announce our 2016 Bioethics Boot Campers.  Seven PhD students were selected through a competitive process to participate in Bioethics Boot Camp, an intensive introduction to bioethics that will be held at the department in June 2016.  Bioethics Boot Camp…

Why a constitutional originalist would reject the GOP’s delay, delay, delay tactics

A controversy has erupted over whether the Senate should consider anyone President Obama nominates to the Supreme Court to replace my friend Antonin Scalia, who died unexpectedly Saturday. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.), Judiciary Committee Chairman Chuck Grassley (R-Iowa) and others argue that, because it’s an election year, the…

Interview with Jessica Martuccia about her new book 'Back to the Breast'

Jessica Martucci's fascinating new book traces the emergence, rise, and continued practice of breastfeeding in America in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. Back to the Breast: Natural Motherhood and Breastfeeding in America (University of Chicago Press, 2015) looks at the lives and work of scientists, nurses, medical researchers, lay groups,…

The Power of an Empty Podium

The Republican National Committee and Fox News say there won't be an empty podium on the stage during the Iowa Republican debate to symbolize the absence of Donald Trump. The implication is that that's not fair game. In 1980, Jimmy Carter refused to appear in a League of Women Voters debate…

Is It Better to Die in America or in England?

WE frequently hear complaints about how people near the end of life are treated in America. Patients are attached to tubes and machines and subjected to too many invasive procedures. Death occurs too frequently in the hospital, rather than at home, where the dying can be surrounded by loved ones. And…

Insurer Rewards Push Women Toward Mammograms

A 53-year-old woman on Medicaid in Washington State who has never had a mammogram elects to get one in return for a $15 gift card. A 35-year-old woman in Florida chooses to get her first mammogram because her insurer, Aetna, offers a $50 payroll check. In Iowa, a 46-year-old woman who…

Can Science Predict Political Turmoil?

The big brain pundits are engaged in their annual round of new year-predictions about major world events. But if the past is any measure they will fail miserably. A legion of experts on the Middle East failed to predict the rise of the Islamic State, much less the attacks in Paris…

Mediation Techniques for Managing Clinical Conflict

Special Section: Mediation Techniques for Managing Clinical Conflict Teaching and Learning the Techniques of Conflict Resolution for Challenging Ethics Consultations Edward J. Bergman and Autumn Fiester       Professional mediators have long possessed a skill set that is uniquely suited to facilitation of difficult conversations between and among individuals in emotionally charged…

Dept. of Medical Ethics and Health Policy is closed until Jan. 6

The Department of Medical Ethics and Health Policy is closed for relocation and for the University winter break from December 18 - January 6. Our new address, effective Dec. 22nd, is: Blockley Hall, 14th Floor 423 Guardian Drive Philadelphia, PA 19104 Have a happy and safe holiday season!