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You are viewing 89 posts by the author Dominic Sisti

Announcing the Class of 2019 Fellows in Advanced Biomedical Ethics

Maddy Kilbride will receive her PhD in Philosophy from Princeton this summer. Prior to beginning her PhD, she obtained her BA in Philosophy at Bates and an MA in Philosophy (of Science), also at Princeton. Many of you likely know Maddy, as she was a boot camper last summer and has…

Conflicts of Interest for Patient-Advocacy Organizations

On March 2nd, a team of researchers in the Department of Medical Ethics and Health Policy published in the New England Journal of Medicine one of the first major studies assessing the conflicts of interest of patient advocacy organizations. The team, which included Matthew McCoy, Harald Schmidt, and Ezekiel Emanuel, analyzed…

Human Gene Editing: Where Does the 2017 National Academy of Sciences Report Bring Us?

At the famous Asilomar conference in 1975, it was generally agreed that, owing to the scientific potential of recombinant DNA, the moratorium should be lifted but strict conditions should be put in place to avoid risks to public health and the ecosystem. The scientific community's exercise in self-governance had paid off, with…

Risa Lavizzo-Mourey Appointed Penn Integrates Knowledge Professor

Risa Lavizzo-Mourey has been named the University of Pennsylvania’s 19th Penn Integrates Knowledge University Professor, effective Jan. 1, 2018.   The announcement was made today by Penn President Amy Gutmann and Provost Vincent Price. A world-renowned expert in health policy and geriatric medicine, Lavizzo-Mourey has served since 2003 as president…

How Can I Afford to Work Out Without Going Broke?

“A lot of people try to do the exercise that they think will have the biggest health benefit, but if it’s something you don’t like, then you’re probably not going to stick with it,” said Dr. Kevin Volpp, a medical professor at the University of Pennsylvania who specializes in behavioral psychology.…

Medicare Bundled-Payments Model Cut Joint Replacement Costs By More than 20%

PHILADELPHIA - Bundled payment models can push Medicare and health system costs down considerably without sacrificing quality of care, according to new research from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. The study, the first to combine hospital cost and Medicare claims data to identify drivers of…

Why Aren't More Doctors Using Patient Engagement Tools?

Why Aren't More Doctors Using Patient Engagement Tools? Medical Economics, November 9, 2016 Modern Medicine reports on a new study by CHIBE Director Kevin Volpp, MD, PhD, showing that 69 percent of health care providers are using patient engagement to get patients more involved in their own care, while that number…

Master of Health Care Innovation

The Department of Medical Ethics and Health Policy of the University of Pennsylvania’s Perelman School of Medicine introduces an initiative to address the rapidly changing health care landscape by advancing innovation among health care professionals worldwide: the online Master of Health Care Innovation. The first cohort begins in August 2017. Applications are…

Bioethics Bootcamp Accepting Applications

The Department of Medical Ethics and Health Policy at the University of Pennsylvania is accepting applications for Bioethics Boot Camp, a three-week intensive introduction to bioethics, held at Penn on June 4-23, 2017.  Bioethics Boot Camp is designed for graduate students in philosophy, political theory, law and the social sciences.  At…

Instructional Designer

The Department of Medical Ethics and Health Policy in the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania seeks a bright, motivated Instructional Designer (ID) to lead the translation of the subject expertise of faculty to the online learning environment for effective educational outcomes. Working across the Department’s multiple online…

Interview with Jessica Martuccia about her new book 'Back to the Breast'

Jessica Martucci's fascinating new book traces the emergence, rise, and continued practice of breastfeeding in America in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. Back to the Breast: Natural Motherhood and Breastfeeding in America (University of Chicago Press, 2015) looks at the lives and work of scientists, nurses, medical researchers, lay groups,…

Is It Better to Die in America or in England?

WE frequently hear complaints about how people near the end of life are treated in America. Patients are attached to tubes and machines and subjected to too many invasive procedures. Death occurs too frequently in the hospital, rather than at home, where the dying can be surrounded by loved ones. And…

Insurer Rewards Push Women Toward Mammograms

A 53-year-old woman on Medicaid in Washington State who has never had a mammogram elects to get one in return for a $15 gift card. A 35-year-old woman in Florida chooses to get her first mammogram because her insurer, Aetna, offers a $50 payroll check. In Iowa, a 46-year-old woman who…

Can Science Predict Political Turmoil?

The big brain pundits are engaged in their annual round of new year-predictions about major world events. But if the past is any measure they will fail miserably. A legion of experts on the Middle East failed to predict the rise of the Islamic State, much less the attacks in Paris…

Mediation Techniques for Managing Clinical Conflict

Special Section: Mediation Techniques for Managing Clinical Conflict Teaching and Learning the Techniques of Conflict Resolution for Challenging Ethics Consultations Edward J. Bergman and Autumn Fiester       Professional mediators have long possessed a skill set that is uniquely suited to facilitation of difficult conversations between and among individuals in emotionally charged…

From Alienism to ACOs: Integrating Psychiatry, Again

This column describes the gradual integration of psychiatrists into mainstream general medical care, from their exile as “alienists” in isolated asylums to their current roles in accountable care organizations. The authors note that a contemporary form of alienism persists and argue that conceptual parity—the idea that mental illnesses exist within the…

Where to Draw the Line on Gene-Editing Technology

The biologists have done it again. Not so long ago it was cloning and embryonic stem cells that challenged moral imagination. These days all eyes are on a powerful new technique for engineering or “editing” DNA. Relatively easy to learn and to use, CRISPR has forced scientists, ethicists and policymakers to…

Are Good Doctors Bad for Your Health?

One of the more surprising — and genuinely scary — research papers published recently appeared in JAMA Internal Medicine. It examined 10 years of data involving tens of thousands of hospital admissions. It found that patients with acute, life-threatening cardiac conditions didbetter when the senior cardiologists were out of town. …

Erin Aakhus: A doctor trapped between medical oath and health laws

Maria is a tiny woman in her late 30s. Though she is a mother of two, she hasn't seen her children in more than 10 years. In 2004, she entrusted them to her mother in Honduras when Maria made her way, on foot, to the United States to find work. As…

Oncologists' Experiences and Attitudes About Their Role in Philanthropy and Soliciting Donations From Grateful Patients

Physician participation in philanthropy is important to marshal resources that allow hospitals to pursue their missions, but little is known about how physicians participate and their attitudes toward participation.  Institutions are asking physicians to directly solicit their patients for donations with variability in physicians' perceptions of the impact on relationships with…