• College Hall 3

Current Course Offerings


Summer 2014

BIOE 590 900 - Animal Ethics

Instructor: Anne Barnhill
Time: Tuesdays 4:30-7:00, May 27-August 5

Humans use non-human animals for food, research, companionship, and entertainment, among other things. Which ways of relating to non-human animals are ethical? Which are unethical? Why? Do non-human animals have moral rights, on a par with human rights? Should any non-human animals have legal rights? Are there ethically better and worse forms of animal agriculture, animal research, zoos, hunting, and keeping animals as companions? If some ways that we relate to non-human animals are unethical, why do they continue? What are some psychological barriers to reform?


BIOE 552 900 - Pharmaceutical Ethics

Instructor: Jason Schwartz
Time: Wednesdays 4:30-7:00, May 28-August 6

The testing, regulation, marketing, cost, and safety of pharmaceuticals are among the most complex and controversial topics in contemporary medicine and health policy. In the United States and throughout the world, pharmaceuticals have transformed the practice of medicine, approaches to prevention and treatment, and the creation and evolution of disease definitions, among their many other effects. At the same time, they are a frequent focus of critics who question the conduct of the pharmaceutical industry, the competence of national and international regulators, and the unacknowledged or unidentified risks of pharmaceuticals for patients.

This course will explore the critical yet highly contested place of pharmaceuticals in efforts to protect or improve the health of individuals and populations. In this work, we will direct particular attention to the often underappreciated effects of ethical considerations, individual and community values, and value judgments throughout these activities. Among the specific topics we will examine are: the global pharmaceutical industry, U.S. and international drug clinical trials, drug regulation by the FDA and international authorities, the role of risk-benefit and cost-effectiveness assessments, drug pricing and advertising, global access to pharmaceuticals, and the role of pharmaceuticals in medicalization.


BIOE 560 900 - The Patient-Provider Relationship

Instructor: Ed Bergman
Time: Thursdays 4:30-7:00, May 29-August 7

In recent years the significance of dysfunctional caregiver-patient communications as a cause of patient dissatisfaction and clinical conflict has drawn heightened attention. This course examines the elements of caregiver-patient communications in the formation and maintenance of the physician-patient relationship and considers the status of effective clinical communication as an ethical and legal imperative. “Clinical empathy” is posited as a paradigm for productive management of emotional content within the physician-patient relationship. The concept of “the difficult patient” is explored as a possible misnomer, representing systemic inadequacies in caregiver responsiveness. The prospect of reduced conflict in the clinical setting, and a potential reduction in malpractice claims, are considered as potential by-products of enhanced communication skills. Evolution of the physician-patient relationship from the “physician as expert” to a negotiated “shared decision-making model” is explored through participation in clinical role plays. The implications of “patient autonomy” and “informed consent” for communication within physician-patient relationships are examined. Finally, the course introduces clinical ethics mediation as a preferred methodology for the management of clinical conflict where third-party intervention is required.


BIOE 545 910/547 910 - Mediation Intensive I/III (1 CU)

Instructors: Edward Bergman, Autumn Fiester, and Lance Wahlert
Time: Thursday-Sunday, June 6-9 2014, 9-5pm daily
Location: Room 321

This is an immersion experience of learning through role-playing mediation simulations. It has the same format of the other Mediation Intensives, but will NOT duplicate simulations. Students will:

  • Learn to effectively manage clinical disputes among and between caregivers, patients and surrogates through mediation
  • Discover how to define problems and assess underlying interests to generate mutually acceptable options
  • Role-play in a variety of clinical situations as both disputants and mediators
  • Practice mediation with professional actors
  • Receive constructive feedback in supportive environment

BIOE 546 920/548 920 - Mediation Intensive II/IV (1 CU)

Instructors: Edward Bergman, Autumn Fiester, and Lance Wahlert
Time: Thursday-Sunday, August 14-17 2014, 9-5pm daily
Location: Room 321

For course description, see BIOE 545/547 Mediation Intensive I/III above.



 

Fall 2014


BIOE 601 401/402 - Introduction to Bioethics

Instructor: Autumn Fiester
Time: Tuesdays OR Thursdays, 4:30-7:00, August 28-December 9
Location: 3401 Market St, Room 331

This course is intended to serve as a broad introduction to the field of bioethics. The course will focus on the central areas in research and clinical ethics: genetics, reproduction, end-of-life, informed consent, the history of human subjects research, and surrogate decision-making. In this course we will study case analysis, bioethics concepts, relevant legal cases, and classical readings on the themes.


BIOE 551 001 - Bioethics and Film

Instructor: Lance Wahlert
Time: Thursdays, 4:30-7:00, August 28-December 4
Location: 3401 Market St, Room 321

In reality and metaphorically, cinema has served for generations of moviegoers as a site of communal congregation, pedogogical dissemination, and sometimes disease infection. Accordingly, how and where we watch films are just as important as what films have to say about doctors, disease, and death. This course will consider the epidemiological and cultural implications of cinema on bioethics, including how movies and movie theaters themselves have functioned as spaces of contentious discourse regarding public health. Bearing in mind the recent scholarship of film and medical theorists such as Lisa Cartwright, Paula Triechler, and David Serlin, we will study not only the possibility for film to register and comment on cultural understandings of the clinic, but also the ways cinema itself works out, reimagines, and even changes how the clinic is put into practice. Focusing on themes such as quarantine, vaccination, sexual health, end of life care, professional competence, and globalization, we will be watching and discussing public health films and feature-length films by directors such as Alfred Hitchcock, David Croneberg, Tamara Jenkins, and Todd Haynes. No background in either cinema studies or bioethics is required for this course.


BIOE 575 401 - Health Policy

CROSS-LISTED: BIOE 575 | HCMG 250 | HCMG 850
Instructors: Ezekiel Emanuel & J. Sanford Schwartz
Time: Tuesdays & Thursdays, 4:30-6:00, August 28-December 9
Location: F85, Jon M. Huntsman Hall

The U.S. health care system is the world's largest, most technologically advanced, most expensive, with uneven quality, and an unsustainable cost structure. This multi-disciplinary course will explore the history and structure of the current American health care system and the impact of the Affordable Care Act. How did the United States get here? The course will examine the history of and problems with employment-based health insurance, the challenges surrounding access, cost and quality, and the medical malpractice conundrum.

As the Affordable Care Act is implemented over the next decade, the U.S. will witness tremendous changes that will shape the American health care system for the next 50 years or more. The course will examine potential reforms, including those offered by liberals and conservatives and information that can be extracted from health care systems in other developed countries. Throughout, lessons will integrate the disciplines of health economics, health and social policy, law and political science to elucidate key principles. This course will provide students a broad overview of the current U.S. health care system. The course will focus on the challenges facing the health care system, an in-depth understanding of the Affordable Care Act, and its potential impact upon health care access, delivery, cost, and quality.


BIOE 590 001 - Ethics in Mental Healthcare

Instructor: Dominic Sisti
Time: Mondays, 4:30-7:00, September 8-December 8
Location: 3401 Market St, Room 321

Mental healthcare—which includes but is not limited to psychiatry, psychology, and clinical social work—is an especially ethically fraught subdiscipline of the larger medical enterprise. Issues range from garden-variety problems related to informed consent, patient capacity, and clinical professionalism to novel issues related to involuntary treatment, research on mentally ill persons, questions about free will and nosological categories. This course will present a survey of these ethical issues by first introducing foundational concepts from ethical theory and the philosophy of psychiatry and mind. Students will be expected to become conversant in several bioethical approaches and methods and be able to use them to critically examine both historical and contemporary questions in mental healthcare and research.


BIOE 603 001 - Advanced Clinical Ethics

Instructors: Steven Joffe & Jennifer Walter
Time: Wednesdays, 4:30-7:00, August 27-December 3
Location: 3401 Market St, Room 331

Since the 1960s, medical technology has rapidly expanded our capacity to intervene in people's lives. At the same time, profound changes in the health professions as well as in society at large have led to a renegotiation of the relationship between medicine and society. The field of clinical ethics has worked to understand and to shape these radical changes. Although the reality of human vulnerability to illness may not have changed over the millennia, who qualifies for personhood or what it means to respect human dignity have been up for debate. In this advanced course in clinical ethics, we will explore key ethical debates across the entire life course. We will emphasize an interdisciplinary approach that acknowledges a variety of health care providers' experiences, and will consider some of the challenges in clinical decision-making for and with patients, such as rationing at the besdie and requests for assistance in ending a patient's life. We will also examine policies that impact clinical practice, including systems for organ allocation in transplantation. We will draw upon theories from moral philosophy, clinical cases from our practices and from the media, and seminal legal cases to demonstrate the live ethical challenges of clinical practices today.


BIOE 570 001 - Bioethics and National Security

Instructor: Jonathan Moreno
Time: Tuesdays, 4:30-7:00, September 2-December 9
Location: 3401 Market St, Room 321
Limited Enrollment

At least since Augustine proposed a theory of “just war,” armed conflict has been recognized as raising ethical issues.  These issues have intensified along with the power and sophistication of weapons of war, and especially with increasing engineering capabilities and basic knowledge of the physical world.  The life sciences have had their place in these developments as well, perhaps most vividly with the revelations of horrific experiments conducted by the Nazi and Imperial Japanese militaries, but with much greater intensity due to developments in fields like genetics, neuroscience and information science, and the widely recognized convergence of physics, chemistry, biology and engineering.

The fields of bioethics and national security studies both developed in the decades following World War II.  During the cold war little thought was given to the fact that many national security issues entail bioethical questions, but this intersection has been increasingly evident over the past two decades.  In spite of the overlapping domains of bioethics and national security, there has been remarkable little systematic, institutional response to the challenges presented by these kinds of questions:

  • What rules should govern the conduct of human experiments when national security is threatened?
  • Is it permissible to study ways that viruses may be genetically modified in order to defeat available vaccines, even for defensive purposes?
  • What role may physicians or other health care professionals play in interrogation of suspected terrorists?
  • Must warfighters accept any and all drugs or devices that are believed to render them more fit for combat, including those that may alter cognition or personality?
  • What responsibilities does the scientific community have to anticipate possible “dual purpose” uses or other unintended consequences of its work?

Deploying the resources of ethics, philosophy, history, sociology and political theory, this course will address these and other problems.




 

 
 
 

Recent Courses 

BIOE 505 001 - Bioethics, Sexuality, and Gender

Spring 2014
Instructor: Lance Wahlert
Time: Tuesdays 4:30-7:00, January 21-April 29, 2014

Are sexual and gender diversities a sin?  A crime?  A pathology?  Or a fact of life?  And what’s the difference?

While sexual and gender diversity have been consistent features in most cultures throughout history, how such gender- and sexual-based discussions have been articulated, understood, condoned, or condemned has varied.

If medical historians and queer theorists have paid almost obsessive attention to these subjects, bioethicists have intervened to a lesser degree and on only a handful of relevant subjects.  Bearing in mind the social and medical legacies related to sexual and gender identities, this course will consider a range of historical and contemporary topics which speak to the intersection of bioethical dilemmas on medicine, sexuality and gender identity, including: the gay adolescent, the intersex person, gay-conversion therapies, the prospect of gay gene studies, sex addiction, queer blood/organ donation policies, and the wake of the global HIV/AIDS pandemic.

Specifically, we will focus on literary sources (memoirs, diaries, and films) as well as non-literary accounts (medical texts, bioethical scholarship, and historical records) that explore the emotional and somatic aspects of matters related to sexuality, gender identity, and bioethics.


BIOE 571 001 - Global Health Policy: Justice, Governance and Reform

Spring 2014
Instructor: Jennifer Prah Ruger
Time: Wednesdays 4:30-7:00, January 22-April 30, 2014

This course considers various theoretical approaches to global justice and global governance and analyzes their implications for global health.  The course includes two parts.  The first part examines accounts of cosmopolitanism, nationalism and other theories of global justice, critically assessing duties ascribed by each that may be owed universally to all persons or confined within associative boundaries of communities or nations.   The second part explores applications to global health governance encompassing consideration of human rights and the operation and accountability of global institutions such as the United Nations, the International Monetary Fund, the World Bank, and the World Health Organization. The course scrutinizes the relevance of global justice for governing the global health realm, evaluating the current global health system and proposals for reforming it.


BIOE 558 001 - Ethical Issues in Reproductive Health and Rights

Spring 2014
Instructor: Frances Kissling
Time: Thursdays 4:30-7:00, January 16-April 24, 2014

Whether dealing with personal decisions or public policy, reproductive health matters are almost always controversial and often intractable. It is almost 50 years since the Supreme Court decision Griswold v Connecticut "settled" the right to contraceptives yet the last several years have been marked by increasing legislative action and judicial review of this right. This course will explore the ethical dimensions of reproductive health controversies including  1) the moral and legal status of the human embryo and fetus in the context of assisted reproduction, embryonic stem cell research and abortion; 2) contraception, including over-the-counter provision of emergency contraception and contraceptives and legislation challenges to contraceptive insurance coverage in the Affordable Care Act; 3) attempts to restrict access to abortion by restricting later term abortion, mandating informed consent and waiting periods,  and regulating abortion clinics; 4) maternal-fetal relationship including prenatal testing and the regulation of women's behavior while pregnant; 5) assisted reproduction and 6) global concerns such as sex selective abortion; forced abortion and sterilization and reproductive rights in relation to population dynamics and environmental concerns.


BIOE 565 001 - Rationing and Resource Allocation

Spring 2014
Instructors: Ezekiel Emanuel & Harald Schmidt
Time: Wednesdays 4:30-7:00, January 22-April 30, 2014

You have one liver but three patients awaiting a liver transplant.  Who should get the liver?  What criteria should be used to select the recipient? Is it fair to give it to an alcoholic?  These are some of the questions that arise in the context of rationing and allocating scarce health care resources among particular individuals, and concern what are called micro-allocation decisions.  But trade-offs also need to be made at the meso- and macro-level.  Budgets of public payers of healthcare, such as governments, and of private ones, such as health plans, are limited: they cannot cover all drugs and services that appear beneficial to patients or physicians.  So what services should they provide? Is there a core set of benefits that everyone should be entitled to? If so, by what process should we determine these? How can we make fair decisions, if we know from the outset than not all needs can be met? Using the cases of organs for transplantation, the rationing for vaccines in a flu pandemic, and drug shortages, the course will critically examine alternative theories for allocating scarce resources among individuals.  Using both the need to establish priorities for global health aid and to define an essential benefit package for health insurance, the course will critically examine diverse theories for allocation decisions, including cost-effectiveness analysis, age-based rationing and accountability for reasonableness.


BIOE 580 001 - Research Ethics

Spring 2014
Instructors: Jon Merz & Jennifer Walter
Time: Mondays 4:30-7:00, January 15-April 28, 2014

This seminar is intended to give students a broad overview of research ethics and regulation. The students will come out of the class with an understanding of the historical evolution, moral bases and practical application of biomedical research ethics. The course includes reading assignments, lectures, discussions and practical review of research protocols and in-class interviews with researcher and study subjects. Course topics include history of human subjects protections, regulatory and ethical frameworks for biomedical research, informed consent theory and application, selection of fair research subjects and payment, confidentiality, secondary uses of data and stored tissue, ethics of international research, pediatric and genetic research and conflicts of interest in biomedical research.


BIOE 602 001 - Conceptual Foundations of Bioethics

Spring 2014
Instructor: Autumn Fiester
Time: Tuesdays OR Thursdays 4:30-7:00, January 16-April 24, 2014

This course is one of the 2 foundational courses in the MBE program, which together provide students an entre into the field of Bioethics. In Conceptual Foundations, students examine the various theoretical approaches to bioethics and critically assesses their underpinnings. Topics to be covered include an examination of various versions of utilitarianism; deonotological theories; virtue ethics; ethics of care; the fundamental principles of bioethics (autonomy, beneficence, distributive justice, non-maleficence); casuistry; and pragmatism. The course will include the application of the more theoretical ideas to particular topics, such as informed consent, confidentiality, and end of life issues.

BIOE 550 001 - Bioethics and the Law

Fall 2013
Instructor: Jon Merz
Time: Mondays 
4:30-7:00; September 2-December 9, 2013
Location: Rm. 321

This course will present a broad survey of topics at the intersection of law and bioethics. Much of bioethics deals with topics of public policy, and law is the tool of policy. Areas to be covered will range from an overview of American law making to enforcement mechanisms, on topics including FDA regulations, state interventions into beginning and end of life issues, privacy, malpractice, healthcare reform, and international issues, including those related to innovation and access to medicines.


BIOE 551 001 - Introduction to Medical Humanities

Fall 2013
Instructor: Lance Wahlert

Time: Thursdays 4:30-7:00; August 29-December 5, 2013
Location: Rm. 321

How do literature, theater, the visual arts, the history of medicine, and contemporary social media affect and change the terrain of present-day bioethics?  In contrast to clinical and philosophical approaches to bioethics, this course embraces a study of scientific and biomedical topics from the disciplinary perspectives of the Humanities: literary studies, history, cultural anthropology, communications, cinema studies, and beyond.  Accordingly, we will spend each week in this class studying the reciprocity that exists between the fields of medicine and the Humanities—each influencing the other.  In addition to disciplinary and historical topics related to the medical humanities, this course will offer specific emphasis on biomedical topics related to race, gender, class, sexuality, and disability.


BIOE 553 001 - The Canon of Bioethics: Classic Works Then and Now

Fall 2013
Instructors: Jonathan Moreno  & Dominic Sisti

Time: Mondays 
4:30-7:00; September 2-December 9, 2013
Location: Rm. 331

This course will offer a survey of key documents in the history of bioethics such as the Hippocratic Oath, the Nuremberg Code, and the Belmont Report--alongside important works in the philosophy of medicine that collectively created the foundation for the young field.  We will also consider the documentary value of certain films, such as Who Should Survive? and Dax's Case. The great documents will be supplemented by important readings that place them in context and help show how understandings of bioethical principles and themes have been modified and refined, revealing how these documents have responded to key contemporary triggers of ethical reflection.


BIOE 556 001 - Evidence in Bioethics and Health Policy

Fall 2013
Instructor: Chris Feudtner
Time: Tuesdays 4:30-7:00; September 3-December 10, 2013

The ability to critically appraise scholarly work is a necessary skill for effectively contributing to bioethics and  health policy debates, and for developing and implementing health interventions.  The objective of this course is to provide students with the skills needed to become fluent in the reading and assessment of empirical bioethics and health services research.  The course will review and evaluate a wide range of qualitative and quantitative methods used in bioethics, health policy, and medical research.  Specifically, students will learn the conceptual rationale for standard qualitative and quantitative methods, including their strengths and weakness.  At course completion, students should be able to critically evaluate empirical research published in top bioethics,  health policy, and medical journals.


BIOE 570 001 – Bioethics and Genetics

Fall 2013
Instructors: Pamela Sankar & Angela Bradbury
Time: Wednesdays
 4:30-7:00; August 28-December 4, 2013
Location: Rm. 331

More than 20 years have passed since the inception of the Human Genome Project.  Where are we now?  The results of the HGP have shaped medical practice and have changed the way people talk about themselves and their relationships.  In this course students will be introduced to basic genetics and to recent advances in the genetic and genomic sciences.  We will explore the ethical, legal, and social implications  of these trends while discussing topics such as whole genome testing, ancestry and race, forensic genetics, and the relationship of genetics to health disparities.

 

BIOE 575 401 – Health Policy

Fall 2013
Instructors: Ezekiel Emanuel  and J. Sanford Schwartz
Time: Tuesdays AND Thursdays, 4:30-6:00 pm; August 29-December 10, 2013

This course will provide students a broad overview of the current U.S. healthcare system. The course will focus on the challenges facing the health care system, an in-depth understanding of the Affordable Care Act, and its potential impact upon health care access, delivery, cost, and quality.

The U.S. health care system is the world's largest, most technologically advanced, most expensive, with uneven quality, and an unsustainable cost structure. This multi-disciplinary course will explore the history and structure of the current American health care system and the impact of the Affordable Care Act. How did the United States get here? The course will examine the history of and problems with employment-based health insurance, the challenges surrounding access, cost and quality, and the medical malpractice conundrum.

As the Affordable Care Act is implemented over the next decade, the U.S. will witness tremendous changes that will shape the American health care system for the next 50 years or more. The course will examine potential reforms, including those offered by liberals and conservatives and information that can be extracted from health care systems in other developed countries. The second half of the course will explore key facets of the Affordable Care Act, including improving access to care and health insurance exchanges, improving quality and constraining costs through health care delivery system reforms, realigning capacity through changes in workforce and medical education, and potential impact on biomedical and other innovation. The course will also examine the political context and process of passing major legislation in general and health care legislation in particular, including constitutional arguments surrounding the Affordable Care Act. Throughout, lessons will integrate the disciplines of health economics, health and social policy, law and political science to elucidate key principles.


BIOE 601 001 – Introduction to Bioethics

Fall 2013
Instructor: Autumn Fiester

Time: Tuesdays OR Thursdays
 4:30-7:00; August 29-December 10, 2013
Location: Rm. 331

This course is intended to serve as a broad introduction to the field of bioethics. The course will focus on the central areas in research and clinical ethics: genetics, reproduction, end-of-life, informed consent, the history of human subjects research, and surrogate decision-making. In this course we will study case analysis, bioethics concepts, relevant legal cases, and classical readings on the themes.

BIOE 546 920/548 920 - Mediation Intensive II/IV (1 CU)

Summer 2013
Instructors: Edward Bergman, Autumn Fiester, and Lance Wahlert
Time: Thursday-Sunday, August 15-18th 2013, 9-5pm daily
Location: Room 321

This is an immersion experience of learning through role-playing mediation simulations. It has the same format of the other Mediation Intensives, but will NOT duplicate simulations. Students will:

  • Learn to effectively manage clinical disputes among and between caregivers, patients and surrogates through mediation
  • Discover how to define problems and assess underlying interests to generate mutually acceptable options
  • Role-play in a variety of clinical situations as both disputants and mediators
  • Practice mediation with professional actors
  • Receive constructive feedback in supportive environment

BIOE 552 900 - Medicine and Bioethics in the City of Brotherly Love

Summer 2013
Instructor: Nora Jones
Time: Thursdays 4:30-7:00; May 23-August 8, 2013

Philadelphia is in many ways a microcosm of the history of medicine and bioethics in the United States, and continues to hold national influence (20% of all active practitioners in the United States have trained at some point in their careers here). This course will use archives, scholarly articles, fiction, and field trips to survey medicine and bioethics here in our own city of Brotherly Love.  We will look at the individuals, institutions, and cultural contexts behind many of our successful innovations, failures, and controversies, including:

  • Innovation in medical and nursing care and education (The Pennsylvania Hospital, the University of Pennsylvania, the Philadelphia Nursing Society, Old Blockley)
  • Public health advances in clean water, epidemic management, and health tracking (the Fairmount Water Works, the Lazaretto quarantine station, the Board of Health)
  • Struggles for gender and racial equality (the Women’s Medical College, the integration of African American doctors in the city)
  • The at times contentious relationships of anatomy, medical art, and medical museums (Eakins, the Academy of Fine Arts, the Mutter, the PMA)
  • The business and challenge of medical innovation (CHOP’s conjoined twins, HUPs gene therapy trials)
  • The ethics and economics of pharmaceutical development (the Delaware Valley’s ‘pharma belt’)

Issues around access to transplant and transplant tourism (Amelia, local hospital involvement in the Rosenbaum kidney ‘cartel’
Throughout the course we will focus on the interrelationships among medicine, science, technology, economics, gender, race, and populations as key elements in understanding the cultural landscape of medicine, health care, and bioethics here in Philadelphia. We will explore how this local context can illuminate trends more nationally and globally. This class is geared for students interested in a survey of key bioethics themes and issues, the social history of medicine, and in anthropological approaches to medicine, public health, and bioethics.


BIOE 550-900 - Vaccine Ethics

Summer 2013
Instructor: Jason Schwartz
Time: Tuesdays 4:30-7:00; May 21-August 6, 2013

Vaccination is routinely cited as one of the foremost achievements in the history of public health. Despite this record of success, vaccines are also a frequent source of controversy, with critics in the United States and worldwide questioning their safety, effectiveness, and necessity. Persistent allegations of a link between childhood vaccines and autism, vocal opposition to U.S. state laws that mandate vaccination in order to attend school, and debates over the appropriate distribution of vaccines during public health emergencies are three of the most visible examples of the often contentious atmosphere surrounding vaccination programs and policy.

In this course, we will examine the varied ways in which ethical considerations inform and shape contemporary discussions of vaccination among government health officials, the scientific and medical communities, and the lay public. Among the areas we will consider and evaluate are:

  • The ethical arguments embedded in justifications provided by public health advocates for expanded vaccination activities, including those involving coercion or compulsion,
  • The ethical foundations of responses from some parents and other critics of contemporary vaccine regulation, promotion, and policy, and
  • The ethical obligations, if any, that exist for governments of wealthy countries or multi-national vaccine manufacturers to support (financially or otherwise) vaccination efforts in developing nations.

Course topics include: Vaccination and the ethics of public health; vaccine research and development; decision-making, regulation, and risk-benefit assessments; safety monitoring and injury compensation; vaccines and autism; vaccine financing and access; mandatory vaccination programs; vaccines in pandemics and bioterrorism; human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines; eradication campaigns; vaccination and the developing world.

 

BIOE 551-910 - Social Approaches to Medicine and Bioethics

Summer 2013
Intstructor: Cynthia Patton
Time: Mondays and Wednesdays, 4:30-6:30
*May 20-June 27, 2013* (Please note: this is a 6-week course)

Empirical work how individuals understandings and enact ethical principles has a long history in the social sciences. This course introduces students to the theoretical and methodological aspects of the social and cultural study of health and bioethics as we explore research on such topics as: how health professionals acquire their professional identity, the role of narrative in patient and provider communication, the relationship between scientists and health professionals, and the potential for these traditions and their research strategies to inform how we understand the practical application of bioethical principles on research ethics reviews boards, in clinical settings, and as a mechanism for addressing inter-sectoral or international health inequities. The course structure will include lectures, small interprofessional working groups, and short written assignments leading to a final paper in the student's area of interest.


BIOE 545 910/547 910 - Mediation Intensive I/III (1 CU)

Summer 2013
Instructors: Edward Bergman, Autumn Fiester, and Lance Wahlert
Time: Thursday-Sunday, June 6-9th 2013, 9-5pm daily
Location: Room 321